dealing with creative blockage

Dealing with the Ingenuity Jam

And: 7 tips for dealing with creative blockage

Novelists talk about “hitting the wall” and suffering “Writer’s Block” and I hope you haven’t come across these things yet if working on your NaNoWriMo 2020 project, but I think writers are wrong to think it’s their writing that somehow got stuck or log-jammed or gummed-up — it’s not the words, anyone can write a jumble of words that will ultimately make a 50 thousand word book — a computer can readily do it these days… no, it is a blockage in your imagination that has created the delay… it is not the diligent effort of writing that has become a burdensome task, but a lack of brilliance in your conceptualisation.

At the beginning you had a great idea, a wonderful concept, and an unbeatable design template, but after 10,000 words, or maybe 20,000 in your case, you lost your vision! Your mental image is not as good as when you started… it is your inventiveness and ingenuity that hit a wall, not the tap-tapitty-tap-tap of your fingertips on the keyboard.

So how do you revitalize your imagination?

Here are seven tips for dealing with creative blockage:

1: Take a trip into your world. In this thought experiment, you will be a visitor to the world you have created. So go to a scene (one you’ve already written) and look around. What do you see? Who do you meet? Who most interests you, and why? What do you like? What don’t you like? When you have finished your visit, go home (come back to the here and now) and write-up your experiences and report as if you are a journalist.

2: Seek the novelty of creation. Go visit DeviantArt and tap in a criteria into their search tool. I suggest you search under the name of your character or a word from the title of your book, or a spell or tool your hero uses. See what other creative minds are doing with that word.

3: Alter your pondering habits. You often hear entrepreneurs saying things like “let’s approach this from another direction” or “let’s see this from a different perspective” and that’s because they are “seeing” the project through the eyes of a creator / developer. They know they will need to see the concept through the eyes of a customer, so they tend to re-orientate their perspectives to come up with fresh ideas. Now, it would be nice to share ideas with your clients (those are your readers, if you are a novelist) but I don’t know if you would be brave enough to do this at an early stage in the development of your artwork (artists rarely like to have their work seen until it’s fully “done” — I know I don’t!) But you could get into the head of a potential reader, right? Do that now. Become a reader and ask some basics: where is this story going? Should the main character change? What do I like about the story so far? What would keep me reading? What would make me leave this book? What would make me cry? What would make me happy? What would make me scream? What would make me so excited I want to tell the world about this book?

4: Focus your creative energies. You’re writing a lot. That’s good. But it’s not the only creative thing you do, is it? You are a word maker, yes, so why not scribble some words? Get yourself a new ink pen (see my report here) and write some notes by hand. Use your ink pen to start (and keep) an “ideas” notebook, where you jot down things that come to mind.

Make a deck of cards, 52 would be desirable but twenty will do (make it an even number) one for each character / and or item or location in your story (like a custom Tarot set). Try to draw a picture on each. Add as much (or as little) decoration as you’d like. Once done, divide the deck into four suits: two good /bad quarters, then two slightly less good/bad quarters. You will make moral and reflective judgments. You could then play with your Tarot cards too. Shuffle them and deal six. What happened?

5: Develop imagination in other ways. Have you already completed your playlist for your project? (Recommended by NaNoWriMo). If you add your playlist to Spotify or Soundcloud (recommended) you are making a public statement. That’s good, it means you are making a commitment to your imagination. These will be songs / pieces of music that have inspired (or will inspire) your story. Also, another thing, have you already started your “Mood Board” on Pinterest? If not, get that started too. If you have done both these things already, take time-out to update them.

6: Allow stillness into your life. Have you given yourself sufficient quiet time? How can you expect the most complicated regions of your brain to function effectively if you don’t give them room to breathe? I don’t require you to meditate by candlelight in a yoga position (you can if it helps) but, on the other hand, I strongly suggest you put aside at least twenty minutes a day for “quiet time” when you deliberately shut-out the noise of the world (no phone, no interruptions) and let the stillness feed your spirit (and therefore your creativity). I know this is difficult in a modern world, and perhaps even more tough right now in 2020 (you might need noise-cancelling headphones) but it is a discipline that I am sure will offer you great benefits. Do it now. Slot stillness into your schedule.

7: Invest in creative play. Children have natural imaginations and are not defeated by the limitations of science, common sense, and rationality. But how do we get our vivid childhood imagination back? Well, a good way is to play. Play is an important part of the creative process, and sometimes we forget how crucial it is. So head over to a major e-commerce site (there are several to choose from) and buy yourself a gift… go ahead, you deserve it. You’re doing great. Here are the best:

  • Paper making kit (come on, you gotta get this if you’re a writer!)
  • Modelling clay kit
  • Make your own bath bomb kit
  • Decorate your own water bottle
  • Pom-pom making kit
  • Kit to make hand puppets
  • Mini kit to make animal candles
  • Kit to make balloon animals

Got any tips, advice, examples or suggestions? Tweet me @neilmach

My NaNoWriMo Profile here: https://nanowrimo.org/participants/neil_mach

And keep your ‘lil words rolling in! Good luck with your novel.
Keep your imagination healthy!

Neil Mach is author of “So You Want to Write Fantasy?” and host of the Myth & Magic fantasy writer’s podcast.

My New Pen

My New Ink Pen

Writing with pens seems so old-fashioned! Who does it? Who writes with a pen these days? Um? Nobody, that’s who! A pen is an anachronism, right?

Well, in a recent blog post titled: “How to write with passion” (https://neilmach.me/2020/10/21/how-to-write-with-passion/) I suggested several exercises that might help bring passion back into your creative writing. One of my suggestions was to use a “time machine” to return to a more virtuous and guileless time in your life (nothing expensive or technical, I emphasise, I just wanted you to get some modelling clay or a magic painting book and “play” with those creative elements to free your mind of 20/20 worries.)

So after blogging my post I speculated how I could take my own advice and I think I came up with the pretty cool idea. I decided to get myself a fountain pen. Yes, a fountain pen!

The last time I “bothered” to use an ink pen was in the mid-1980s, when I became half interested in calligraphy (I’ve always had horrible handwriting and I thought, maybe mistakenly, that calligraphy would help me… note: it didn’t). The reason my handwriting is atrocious is because my “hand can’t keep up with my mind.” For many years I have written in a kind of shorthand (part Pitman, part scrawl). This is very useful for taking notes (I am a journalist by semi-profession) but the output is hardly legible and very far from artistic!

you had to continually “dip” the scratchy pointed end in the inkwell
…you had to continually “dip” the scratchy pointed end in the inkwell

When I first went to school (in the early sixties) we used “dip pens.” If you don’t know what they are, you are very lucky. They are like Beelzebub’s bloody bayonets, especially in the tiny hands of a five-year-old. About 6 inches long, and made of wood, with a replaceable nib (can I have a new nib, miss?) the instrument had no ink reservoir, so you had to continually “dip” the scratchy pointed end in the inkwell which was (a hole) on the edge of your desk.

One of the first things you did, as a school kid in those dark days, was to make yourself a blotter. Each of you were given a lovely slice of blotting paper and you had to stick a card on the back and draw a picture on the “un-used” side (mine was a picture of a ginger cat, I remember) and then put your name on it. Blotters were “precious,” so God help you if you misplaced yours. And, good grief, I had to use that darned thing all the time. Over and over. I’m sure I didn’t write a single word without making a mess. An ink stain would spread, like a splatter of blood, from the end of every painful word. Good grief! It was excruciating. It was unbearable. Perhaps more so for me because I longed to write — I hungered to write. I suppose the smartest kids in my class might have been able to write a few words, successfully, without setbacks and blotches, but I was never one of them.

My experience with dip pens was one of embarrassment, frustration, and sometimes tense despair as I tried to pen more than three words without having to stop, re-ink, re-blot, and then have myself a little sob. Imagine writing three words a minute. Then try to imagine writing an essay at that speed. And of course my little cold fingers, then my palms, and soon or later all my clothes would be stained blue with “school ink.” I often wonder how many aspiring authors of my generation were put off by those blasted dip-pens. Even now, I feel myself becoming maddened by the stupid things.

But, at the age of about eight, we were expected to graduate from dip pens to fountain pens. This was a rite of passage, and anyone my age (from Great Britain) will remember it. Usually the schoolkids got their first proper fountain pen on their eighth birthday (or the Christmas nearest that date) and it came nested in a plastic box. It was (purportedly) a thing of immense beauty… you could tell how amazing it was because all the adults in your life would look wide-eyed when you opened your box and they couldn’t hold-back their gasping oohs and aahs as you pulled the pen from its velveteen nest. The adults admired it as if it was a baby dragon.

In the U.K. we only had one brand: Parker. So it would have been a Parker that you lifted from the velveteen. Your first real pen. Actually, that last bit is not true. There were other fountain pens available (which were so out of our reach, for example those made by Montblanc, that they might as well have been available only on Mars, for all it mattered. ) And, conversely, the high street giants WH Smith (and Woolworths) sold their own pale imitations of Parker pens. And that’s what I got on my eighth birthday. I was gifted with a “Winfield Wonder”, also known as Woolie’s own brand.

But before you take your violin out of its case to play me a sad Adagio, let me tell you that my Winfield “Parker” was as good as the real thing. Better. It was stupendous. It was incomparable to the hideous dip pens. You had your own Quink pot (my Quink never ran out, though they could dry away if you left the lid off, it happened to my sister, never a good idea) and you filled the tank in the pen by squeezing some plastic bladdery thing at the end, using the tweezery thing that was a metal calliper thingy. This allowed the little bladder to suck up a quantity of Quink (that was the trade name for the ink they sold in the high street Woolworths, in case you’ve been wondering) and then you could write a page, maybe even a page and a half, without interruption. It was a blessing! Everyone loved their fountain pens. You would carry it in your blazer pocket, and if you were lucky enough to own a real Parker, the arrow on the pen clip (the brand’s emblem) was a badge of honour. The less wealthy kids in my school kept their pens in the inside pocket to hide away the sad Winfield logo.

There’s an insufferable advert on UK telly which is evidently aimed at people from my generation (because they’re selling funeral insurance, thank you) and their fantastic — almost unbelievable offer is that they’ll send you a real Parker Pen “just for applying...” Wow, you may own a great family home, you will have raised and financed two children and got them off your hands and into university, you will have bought yourself a quality car, you’d probably possess everything you ever dreamed of back in the Sixties except that one illusory thing… the most ultra-seductive and almost unattainable item in the world…what is it? A f*****g Parker pen! And this bunch of scammers and scuzzball con-artists will send you your heart’s greatest desire “just for applying.”

At about the age of fourteen, they invented cartridge pens with modern plastic ink cartridges. In reality, cartridge pens had existed for years before that, but their original cartridges were bulky and impossible to dispose of. A cartridge pen is basically a fountain pen, with the same tip and all that, but instead of the bladder and calliper setup I tried to describe earlier, with these pens you had a disposable ink tube that snapped into the end of the whole thing with a bite. You then screwed the pen up and it was ready to write. No more Quink bottles, no more smudges, no more finger spots. Well, that’s the theory, anyway. If I remember correctly, the cartridge had to make a gratifying click when the whole mechanism came together. If you didn’t do this … heaven help you! Because then the cap would secretly fill with ink and the next time you used the pen, bam! the thing became an ink bomb and when it exploded you’d be puddled and splotched. Of course, by then you wouldn’t have a homemade blotter any more (not required, said the adverts) so the ink would go everywhere. Most of my friends flannelled the ink up with the sleeves of their school blazers. That’s because your mother never saw the condition of your jacket sleeves, she only inspected your shirt, underwear, and trousers.

Ballpoint pens had been popular (overseas) since the 1950s, but they weren’t really seen in the UK until BICS and other pens were aggressively marketed in television commercials. Papermates! Click click! When you were around 14 years old, you would probably get what they called a “gift set” for Christmas. This would be (if your parents were rich) a set in a box that included a Parker Cartridge pen, a Parker ballpoint pen and a Parker propelling pencil. The propelling pencil rarely worked, the ballpoint pen only lasted half a school term, and all that was left was the Parker Pen and it wasn’t required because your old one still worked well. (Of course I was given the substandard Winfield version of this gift set, but don’t get me wrong, I was happy with it and very grateful.)

When I finally dropped out of school and started working in the City of London in the early 1970s, we were no longer using ink pens. From then on, everyone used ballpoint pens (fibre tips were popular too). And throughout my entire working life since then, I never touched an ink pen again.

Except. Except, now. Yes, I know that fountain pens no longer seem a very sensible writing tool. And I know they are useless for everyday use, but the humble ink pen has somehow been elevated to the status of “uplifting life accessory” in this very odd year. Yes, ink pens are seen in the same way that starched cotton or artisan bread is seen. They have somehow been transfigured in our collective imagination (from something horrid and unpleasant) to become something wonderfully healthy just because they come from a simplistic time, so they are comforting in a kitschy nostalgic way.

My new pen: a solid blue marble gold-tipped by Jinhao

So I looked-up fountain pens on eBay (other multinational e-commerce corporations are available) and was surprised and delighted by what I found. Everyone else has apparently had the same thought as me (probably inspired by the free Parker pens offered by those lowlife scumbag funeral people, I expect) and so the market is full of magnificent & outstanding quality ink pens, impressive looking, too. In all shades and colours. And at incredible prices.

So, I bought myself a solid blue marble gold-tipped Jinhao fountain pen (Jinhao pens are made in China by Shanghai Qiangu Stationery Company) that has been built to look and feel like a classic Montblanc. (The Jinhao motto is something along the lines of: “this is not a fancy pen… it just looks and feels like one.”)

And, my word, when I unpacked it, I was blown away. It has the same balance, weight, radiance and irrefutable elegance of a classic Montblanc. (To be honest, not that I’d actually know, I have never handled a Montblanc pen, but this is from an entirely Parker driven perspective) — my gosh — this is a wonderful pen. It’s the best pen I’ve ever owned. Not strictly a fountain pen (it came with five cartridges), it penned (I hope that’s the verb) so flawlessly and effectively that I went and got myself a pad of writing paper just to write some rubbish. It’s so good, in fact, that I put another three Jinhao pens into my wish list… and here’s the most staggering thing of all: my new pen cost me £6.99 (postage included.) What? Yeah, you heard right, just seven bucks. The one I want next has the map of the universe on its side. It will cost a whopping eight bucks. And there’s one with a compass on the lid (five bucks) and one entirely made from rosewood ( this is really expensive, though, it will cost me a tenner if I put it in my basket.) You can even get a pure chrome one for sick squid and a clear blue transparent one for the price of a Starbuck’s Caramel Grande. What you waiting for?

Right, where is the blotter? Let’s get some more ink writing done…

Comment below or tweet me @neilmach

Words: @neilmach 2020 ©

The English novelist Neil Mach has gained widespread recognition for the creation of strong female characters and for compelling stories that often revolve around the themes of loyalty and duty.

His character MOONDOG is a Romani detective. He is called-in when other investigators hesitate. The detective inquires into things that lay “beyond normal human experience” where things hang in the balance between mundane and miraculous.

How to write with passion

Writing With Passion
Writing With Passion

Does passion drive the core of your being?

If passion isn’t driving your creativity — your writing might be becoming lukewarm. How do you stop that from happening? And did you ever write with passion in the first place? Here are some helpful tips to help you keep your passion for writing. But, first, what is passion and how do we use this vital emotion when we write?

Passion is not a magical alchemy that only manifests itself in church or on a soccer field. It is there for us all, a free gift, to use as fuel. Passion is an unlimited and amazing fuel.

Passion inspires a person to live and to create. It’s about dreaming. It is about tangible creation. It goes beyond dreams though, to propel creative people towards excellence. If you don’t fight for anything, your life is empty. If you don’t allow your passion to develop, you will never become the entire self you want to be, you will never attain the complete youness of you.

Any creative individual is just the capacity and scope of their passions.

Passion comes from deep within the heart and, indeed, from the soul itself.

Passion is an emotion. And it is a wonderful emotion too. Emotions exist so we are neither hungry nor thirsty, nor eaten by a bear or trip headlong into a burning pit on our journey through life. Emotions keep us safe. Emotions help us make the right decisions. With emotions in control of our destiny, we will never be so shaken that we explode. The thrill of passion is that it focuses our efforts on the things that bring us the greatest rewards.

  • Passions rarely go beyond childhood. Why?
  • Successful people create their own passions — they don’t wait for them to come along
  • People don’t automatically excel at their chosen passion, it takes courage, practice & commitment to turn something into a passion
  • Creating and inventing are passions: shooting-down, sniping, demolishing or criticizing other people’s works are quite the opposite

So the best way to know if you (still) write with passion is to ask yourself these simple questions:

  • Is this the best way to be myself?
  • Who am I doing this writing for?
  • Does this writing represent who I think I am?
  • Does this work represent all the things I stand for?
  • Am I being honest with myself or am I doing this for someone else?
  • Do I love doing this? If not, why not? What stands in the way of my love?
  • Do I really enjoy this genre? Or am I kidding myself?
  • If I couldn’t do this type of writing, how would I feel?
  • If this were taken away from me, right now, would it weaken and diminish me or would it free me?
  • Does my creativity glow inside my core like a super-solar beacon?

If, after reading these points, you have doubts or hesitations, don’t worry just yet — it could be because you need re-calibration. This happens a lot to creative people. They lose their way in a maze of alternatives, fresh options, flip-flopping concepts, displaced loyalties, alternative goal setting, and general disconnect. In short, you might have lost sight of your dream.

So if you have reached a state of imbalance and perhaps stagnation too, do these exercises to get back on track:

  • read fifty pages every morning of a book you normally wouldn’t read anymore (because you’ve grown out of it.) I recommend Enid Blyton’s Famous Five’s or Roald Dahl’s The Witches or JM Barrie’s Peter Pan, but there are many more. Don’t care what people “think” about your reading choice, this isn’t about them, it’s about you
  • Use a time travel device. Tackle an activity you haven’t done in a long time or you’ve never done before. This will help your creative mind journey back to your childhood (get a pogo stick, hopper ball, skipping rope, skate board) Make sure the activity is physical and requires time and patience to get it right.
  • try your hand at a magic painting book (I recommend Federica Iossa and Sam Taplin, who do fantasy scenes that are quite magical.) Or play with vegetable modeling clay (Jovi do a pack of bright colors for about $9 or £8) Or try your hand at Pipe Cleaner Craft (a bumper pack of 200 stems is about $8) or get yourself a pom-pom maker, a kit without yarn is the same price as the above crafts. The idea here is to do something that requires attention (but not utter concentration) while you get better (and your creativity juices are re-focused) as you practice.
  • Listen to bubble-gum pop: (seek out “I Want Candy” and “Sugar, Sugar” [by The Archies] and “Yummy, Yummy, Yummy”). See if you can find your own set of sweet soda sounds and add them to your playlist
  • create new words or terms to replace stale old ones. For example: a politician is a = figmentaller, an epidemic is a = verbubonic tombola, an election is = pickalumny, winter is the = season of giftragical gloomagles (these are mine, create your own and the idea here is to focus on things that currently irritate or distress you)
  • Pick a random topic each day and write 200 hundred words about it. Hubspot have a random topic generator here: https://www.hubspot.com/blog-topic-generator I also like the random conversation starter here at capitalizemytitle.com: https://capitalizemytitle.com/random-topic-generator/ the general idea here is to write something that is normally “out of reach” of your mind

Tips to keep your passion for writing alive:

  • Practice makes passion stronger; if you don’t practice, your passion will disappear
  • Don’t feed your brain with fear and disappointment, set goals that are rational and sensible. Be nice (to yourself)
  • A challenge is all very well, but it won’t help if your passion is injured by an unrealistic self-imposed limit or unfair wordcount target
  • Reward yourself when deadlines are met. Reaching goals is satisfying and it’s part of the passion process. So, to make sure you’re full to the brim with energy, and ready to face the impossible again soon, give yourself a brief rest and reward yourself
  • Don’t imagine your goals must always be towering or staggering. Sometimes nice little goals that can be accomplished in a day or even a few hours can make a much bigger difference to your health and well-being than a passion that will take a lifetime to complete. Do you think Edmund Hillary just climbed Everest? Of course not, he did a lot of small hills. Do you think Haile Gebrselassie (Olympic long-distance runner) runs a marathon every day? Of course not, he merely jogs around his neighborhood. So keep your goals reasonable. And keep them fun.

    Keep the passion going!

    Neil Mach is the author of “So You Want to Write Fantasy?” out NOW on Amazon Kindle

Myth and Magic EP 8 — Fantasy Writers Kitbag — Episode 8 SHOW-NOTES

Folklore and fantasy themes aimed at creative writers: to start writing stories and challenge your brain with exciting ideas, dip into this kit-bag. Learn how fantasy worlds draw on real world history, mythology, and folklore. And there’s weekly news from the world of fantasy fiction too, plus fabulous creatures, studies on folk tales, nature fables and lots more mythical, magical fun.

CLICK HERE for >>> Episode Eight: 30M

This week I start prepping for NANOWRIMO and I encourage any fantasy fiction writers listening to this podcast to begin plotting too! Today I look at the various stage of a Hero’s Journey and discover Markstein’s criteria. I also visit the Celtic Way and consider the race of Celts. I consider the Guardian list of the 100 best books of the 21st century and I ponder Gwyneth Paltrow’s (empty) bookcase and try to imagine the books I would like to add. The Wildflower of the week is the Blackberry.

Now its NanNo Prep Time are you ready to start plotting out your fantasy fiction?

What form is your protagonist going to take?

Male /female/ gender fluid?
Old, young, ageless?

What form is your main antagonist going to take?

Male /female/ gender fluid?
Old, young, ageless?
Special powers?

What form is your tale going to take?

A quest
Coming of age

How will you construct your fictional world?

How does it differ to (this) real one?
What are the similarities?
What technology does it have?
Does your fictional universe have its own internal logic
Have you created a timeline to ensure consistency and continuity

Will your fictional world comply with Markstein’s criteria?

If characters A and B meet, they are in the same universe
Characters cannot be connected by real people
Characters cannot be connected by characters that do not originate with your published work
Specific fictionalized versions of real people can be used i.e Robin Hood or King Arthur
Characters are only considered to have met if they appeared together in the story

What will be the Triggering Event ?

How does your protagonist resist the call to adventure? Why won’t he/she/it go? What’s preventing their adventure?

(After the first plot point, there will be several chapters where the protagonist is learning about the new world. They might be doing research, or discovering things in conversations. There needs to be conflict and tension, which builds up to the first Pinch Point.
This doesn’t have to be a literal battle, but it is the first major interaction with the antagonist. The antagonist might not be visible yet, but they should be the one pulling the strings. The antagonist is after something, and that something is tied to the MC somehow…)

What does the Protagonist have that the antagonist needs or wants?

What will be the first pinch point?

Midpoint—the shift from victim to warrior – (after the first pinch point, the protagonist continues to face new challenges, but are in a defensive role. They might make some plans, but mostly they’re waiting for something to happen and reacting to events rather than being proactive.) Why does the protagonist decide to take action. What turns him around from being a victim to being a hero?)

This leads to a second confrontation with the antagonist (the protagonist realize that everything is much worse than they thought, and they realize they’ve underestimated the antagonist’s power.)

The protagonist tries to fix things, but things keep getting worse and worse, leading to a total, devastating loss… so we arrive at the the dark night of the soul.

What will be the First Major Turning Point in the story?

How will the antagonist get the upper hand?

The Triumph:

(Perhaps, after a pep talk with a close friend, to “gird the loins” the protagonist finds a reason to fight, even if it’s hopeless. Even if it seems impossible to defeat the enemy, there’s no choice but to confront the antagonist.

But now he is prepared—he might have gained a valuable piece of knowledge or information. He might have a new weapon or new power, or he’s learned the villain’s weakness.
The final battle scene often includes a “hero at the mercy of the villain” scene, where the hero is caught, so the villain can gloat. Anyway it’s not a clear, easy victory. They fail at first, all is lost, the hero is captured, the enemy gloats… then the hero perseveres. With resolve and tenacity, the hero escapes and overpowers the villain.
Often the final battle scene also includes a “death of the hero” scene, where the hero, or an ally/romantic interest, sacrifices themselves, and appears to die… but then is brought back to life in joy and celebration.)

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Myth and Magic 3D graphic

Myth and Magic

CLICK HERE to listen to >>> Episode Eightof MYTH & MAGIC 30M

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The Guardian list of 100 best-books-of-the-21st-century

This list of ONE HUNDRED best books of the 21st century (not all are fiction) published this week by the Guardian newspaper, includes just six works that you might accurately describe as “Fantasy Fiction.”

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling (her only Hugo Award winning novel… The Hugos tend to not be given to the same writer twice)
Darkmans by Nicola Barker
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
The Fifth Season by NK Jemisin
Night Watch by Terry Prachett
The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman

Why is this speculative genre so under-represented? (George R. R. Martin isn’t listed at all, but perhaps “A Storm of Swords” and the subsequent two Song of Ice and Fire didn’t make the cut) Is it because fantasy fiction is (these days) is considered to be “Young Adult” and therefore, because the books (purportedly) speak to a younger audience they are somehow considered to be less meritorious?

Is “Dead Until Dark” (Charlaine Harris) young adult fiction?

Or:

Dark Lover J.R. Ward
Vampire Academy Richelle Mead
City of Bones Cassandra Clare
Twilight Stephenie Meyer
The Hunger Games Suzanne Collins , or
The Time Traveler’s Wife Audrey Niffenegger

Oddly (and to even things up a bit) the top 20 best selling books of the 21st Century, combined, have sold over a billion copies. These include:

The “Harry Potter” books, over 225M sold
The “Twilight” books, over 120M sold
The Hunger Games books, over 65M sold
A Song of Ice and Fire” over 60M sold
The Divergent Trilogy over 35M sold

That means more-or-less half of all books sold have been fantasy fiction. Ha! [Stats from https://elitewritings.com%5D

Wildflower of the week: BLACKBERRY

All along the CELTIC WAY at this time of the year, you can find Blackberries (sometimes called black-caps in the USA)

aka brummel kites, gater berry, cock brumble, blaggs and mooches.

I can tell you, from experience, these edible fruit from the genus Rubus make the most delicious crumble you’ve ever tasted and go particularly well with sharp cooking apples. The possess a heavenly scent that makes my mouth water with anticipation. When I was young, my sisters and I would go blackberry picking on open land and bring home baskets-and-baskets of berries so my mother could make jam.

Blackberries and raspberries both live on what we call, in England, brambles. Though raspberries are “domesticated” and can be safely grown as “canes” in a garden or plot… whereas blackberries are decidedly wild and would take over an entire garden if not hunted down and eliminated.

Unmanaged plants in the wild form a dense tangle of arching thorny branches and these are often cut into hedgerows and provide important protection for nesting birds and all kinds of animals.

A bog woman who was found naturally in a bog in Jutland, and had died in the pre-Roman Iron Age was found to have eaten millet and blackberries before she had been strangled.

It’s also thought that Blackberry fruit, leaves, and stems were used to dye fabrics and hair. And Native Americans were known to use blackberry stems to make rope.

The delicious loganberry – developed in 1880 in Santa Cruz – is one of the best and most flavoursome cultivars from the original plant.

Blackberry leaves are an important food source for caterpillars; and some grazing mammals, especially deer.

Scottish highlanders once twisted a bramble with ivy and grown to ward away witches and evil spirits.

It was once thought that on Michaelmas day (the holy day of angels 29 September) the devil spat and urinated upon all the fruit and so it was unwise to pick them any more. In Ireland a similar belief held that the pooka ( the nature spirit that I described in my novel Moondog and the Reed Leopard) were responsible for ruining the fruit by pissing on them ( a few weeks later than the devil in England, at Halloween tide.)

CALL OUT 25 SEPTEMBER Assaph Mehr

If you like the idea of togas, daggers and magic and an Urban Fantasy set in a quasi-Ancient Rome intrigues you, then try ASSAPH MEHR and his Murder In Absentia

A young man is found dead in his bed, with a look of extreme agony on his face and strange tattoos all over his body. His distraught senator father suspects a cult death, and knows who to call for discreet resolution.

Enter Felix the Fox, a professional investigator. In the business of ferreting out dark information for his clients, Felix is neither a traditional detective nor a competent magician — but something in between. Drawing on his contacts in shady elements of society and on his aborted education in the magical arts, Felix dons his toga and sets out to discover the young man’s killers.

Murder In Absentia is set in a fantasy world. The city of Egretia borrows elements from a thousand years of ancient Roman culture, from the founding of Rome to the late empire, mixed with a judicious amount of magic. This is a story of a cynical, hardboiled detective dealing with anything from daily life to the old forces roaming the world.

I like the idea that this book will appeal to fans of detective fiction as well as fantasy!
Well done, ASSAPH.

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Myth and Magic 3D graphic

Myth and Magic

CLICK HERE to listen to >>> Episode Eightof MYTH & MAGIC 30M

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NaNoWriMo2016

#Toil #NaNoWriMo2016 #neilmach

#Toil #NaNoWriMo2016 #neilmach

I am busy toiling on my entry for this years National Novel Writing Month —

To succeed I must write 50,000 words in 30 days!

This year’s story is about a modern day witch. She uses forensic trickery to control and manipulate her sex-victims. Alberta Lunn’s trifling in this scientifc hoodoo leads to disastrous consequences when she unwittingly ensnares a dangerous serial-killer. Her only hope is to enlist an erstwhile conquest, a state-level detective.

But he’s a grudging and disinclined ally and time is running out…

So far I have written 11720 good words… So I am at least 3000 terrific words behind schedule!

http://nanowrimo.org/participants/neil_mach/novels/the-bedevilment-of-bertie-lunn