Twenty Things People Hate About Fantasy

I adore fantasy, and let’s be honest, so do you.

Fantasy is the best-selling genre of all time.

But there are people who hate fantasy titles. Yeah, really there are…

So what is it about fantasy that drives people away?

I did a little research into this and I discovered twenty things that fantasy haters don’t like about this most popular of all genres…

What can fantasy authors learn from this list, shared below? Well, maybe they can ration some of the worst stylistic elements and features. Maybe they can listen to the criticisms and make reasonable modifications.

Or, quite the contrary, perhaps they should cram their stories with even more of what those haters hate! After all, they’ll never get it…  but the genuine fans will love those qualities!

Either way, it’s good to know the flip-side of opinion…

20 things people hate about  fantasy

1.      Too little romance or too much romance turns people off. Fantasies seem unable to bring that comforting balance of “just enough” romance
2.      Some think “only children” are instinctively drawn to fantasy worlds, so they have pre-decided that fantasy is “not for adults”
3.      Some people dislike stories that are told without rules or limits
4.      Some find the language (terminology) of fantasy somewhat inaccessible
5.      Some feel fantasy fiction does not focus enough on human experience and individual problems
6.      Some don’t like stories with so many characters to follow
7.      Some dislike prose with so much fussy detail
8.      Some do not have the imagination to immerse themselves in fantastic worlds, it’s just the way their minds are hard-wired
9.      Some do not feel their life requires the escapism that fantasy offers
10.  Some dislike the flowery prose of fantasy

[with thanks to Tom Gaul]

11.  Some dislike the arbitrary power an author extends over character and plot development (i.e. inconsistent rules or ill-conceived magic systems)
12.  Some are unable or unwilling to  “invest” in the span of stories that make up an epic fantasy series… some fantasies tend to go on-and-on
13.  Some  believe fantasy fiction is geared towards the male reader
14.  Skeptics (that’s to say, people who doubt  something is true and useful) say magic is unscientific
15.  The same skeptics say that magic is unrealistic
16.  Worse still, those skeptics say magic is not intellectual or sophisticated enough for them
17.  Recycled tropes are a bore
18.  For some, the sheer size of a single fantasy novel is intimidating (let alone a series of stories)
19.  Fantasy romance is considered unrealistic
20.  Conventional rules of reality can easily be bent or hot-wired by the author; this is seen as short-cutting plot and character development, and so this is “unfair”

Thoughts or comments? Tweet me @neilmach

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Listen to this topic on the Myth & Magic Podcast

Episode 51 on Apple here >>>

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Myth and Magic – The Fantasy Fiction Writer’s Podcast

 

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Celestial Skyfish — Mysterious Flying Rods

Celestial Skyfish — mysterious flying rods

Are spooky flying rods captured on film some kind of temporal or transcendental celestial skyfish? Or are they an alien life form? Or an undiscovered species? Is there a more prosaic explanation?

Flying rods are elongated visual artifacts that materialize in night-time photographic images and especially in video recordings. It’s a fairly recent phenomenon, indicating that recent technology has advanced the documentation of these manifestations.

Some advocates of the paranormal have declared that what you are seeing (above) is an alien life form. Other groups propose that these mirror-like & diaphanous creatures are extra-dimensional.

Whatever they are, the flying animals appear to be thin, silver, and transient, with slender, elongated bodies and multiple wings. They are declared to be “evasive” and “super-fast.”

Pseudoscientists have asserted that these strange life forms are represented in petroglyphs (rock carvings) found throughout the world, which could suggest that prehistoric people could once “see” the cryptids (without technology) and wished to record their experience for posterity.

But, so far, this is what we know :

* Flying rods can’t be seen with the naked eye
* Flying rods happen at night
* Flying rods “appear” best when captured by video
* Flying rods are most obvious when captured with infra red film
* Flying rods become most discernible when running slow shutter speeds
* Flying rods are found in spooky places, such as cemeteries or ruins

What creatures fly at night, become discernible at slow shutter speeds and “haunt” spooky places? Investigators have concluded that the most likely explanation for the existence of flying rods is that they are visual illusions produced onto film by nocturnal flying moths.

Moths attracted by the floodlights set up at the Staging Grounds Swifts Creek Recreation Reserve

It’s comparatively simple to take flying rod photos for yourself… Moths attracted to floodlights  at the Staging Grounds, Swifts Creek Recreation Reserve

The rapid passage of an insect flapping its wings across the scope of a lens is assumed to develop a wand-like visual effect, because of motion blur (apparent streaking). Generally, energetic animals such as moths produce elongated afterimage trails when the flaps are caught on film. The rapid flapping of the wings produces the illusion of those jutting extrusions you see on the “spinal column” of the flying creature.

It’s comparatively simple to take flying rod photos for yourself. If you photograph a cloud of flying insects trapped in the sun and use long exposure, you will notice that a few insects are in focus (others are not) and when some insects fly sideways to your lens, they will appear as elongated flying rods in the image.

Words: @neilmach 2020 ©

Further reading:

http://www.assap.ac.uk/newsite/articles/Flying%20rods.html
http://www.research.swadlincoteparanormal.co.uk/r_rod.htm

The English novelist Neil Mach has gained widespread recognition for the creation of strong female characters and for compelling stories that often revolve around the themes of loyalty and duty.

His character Moondog is a Romani detective. He is called-in when other investigators hesitate. The detective inquires into things that lay “beyond normal human experience” where things hang in the balance between mundane and miraculous.

In the novel Moondog and the Reed Leopard the detective is called to Groby to investigate a spate of Big Cat attacks. The novel is OUT NOW.