How to write with passion

Writing With Passion
Writing With Passion

Does passion drive the core of your being?

If passion isn’t driving your creativity — your writing might be becoming lukewarm. How do you stop that from happening? And did you ever write with passion in the first place? Here are some helpful tips to help you keep your passion for writing. But, first, what is passion and how do we use this vital emotion when we write?

Passion is not a magical alchemy that only manifests itself in church or on a soccer field. It is there for us all, a free gift, to use as fuel. Passion is an unlimited and amazing fuel.

Passion inspires a person to live and to create. It’s about dreaming. It is about tangible creation. It goes beyond dreams though, to propel creative people towards excellence. If you don’t fight for anything, your life is empty. If you don’t allow your passion to develop, you will never become the entire self you want to be, you will never attain the complete youness of you.

Any creative individual is just the capacity and scope of their passions.

Passion comes from deep within the heart and, indeed, from the soul itself.

Passion is an emotion. And it is a wonderful emotion too. Emotions exist so we are neither hungry nor thirsty, nor eaten by a bear or trip headlong into a burning pit on our journey through life. Emotions keep us safe. Emotions help us make the right decisions. With emotions in control of our destiny, we will never be so shaken that we explode. The thrill of passion is that it focuses our efforts on the things that bring us the greatest rewards.

  • Passions rarely go beyond childhood. Why?
  • Successful people create their own passions — they don’t wait for them to come along
  • People don’t automatically excel at their chosen passion, it takes courage, practice & commitment to turn something into a passion
  • Creating and inventing are passions: shooting-down, sniping, demolishing or criticizing other people’s works are quite the opposite

So the best way to know if you (still) write with passion is to ask yourself these simple questions:

  • Is this the best way to be myself?
  • Who am I doing this writing for?
  • Does this writing represent who I think I am?
  • Does this work represent all the things I stand for?
  • Am I being honest with myself or am I doing this for someone else?
  • Do I love doing this? If not, why not? What stands in the way of my love?
  • Do I really enjoy this genre? Or am I kidding myself?
  • If I couldn’t do this type of writing, how would I feel?
  • If this were taken away from me, right now, would it weaken and diminish me or would it free me?
  • Does my creativity glow inside my core like a super-solar beacon?

If, after reading these points, you have doubts or hesitations, don’t worry just yet — it could be because you need re-calibration. This happens a lot to creative people. They lose their way in a maze of alternatives, fresh options, flip-flopping concepts, displaced loyalties, alternative goal setting, and general disconnect. In short, you might have lost sight of your dream.

So if you have reached a state of imbalance and perhaps stagnation too, do these exercises to get back on track:

  • read fifty pages every morning of a book you normally wouldn’t read anymore (because you’ve grown out of it.) I recommend Enid Blyton’s Famous Five’s or Roald Dahl’s The Witches or JM Barrie’s Peter Pan, but there are many more. Don’t care what people “think” about your reading choice, this isn’t about them, it’s about you
  • Use a time travel device. Tackle an activity you haven’t done in a long time or you’ve never done before. This will help your creative mind journey back to your childhood (get a pogo stick, hopper ball, skipping rope, skate board) Make sure the activity is physical and requires time and patience to get it right.
  • try your hand at a magic painting book (I recommend Federica Iossa and Sam Taplin, who do fantasy scenes that are quite magical.) Or play with vegetable modeling clay (Jovi do a pack of bright colors for about $9 or £8) Or try your hand at Pipe Cleaner Craft (a bumper pack of 200 stems is about $8) or get yourself a pom-pom maker, a kit without yarn is the same price as the above crafts. The idea here is to do something that requires attention (but not utter concentration) while you get better (and your creativity juices are re-focused) as you practice.
  • Listen to bubble-gum pop: (seek out “I Want Candy” and “Sugar, Sugar” [by The Archies] and “Yummy, Yummy, Yummy”). See if you can find your own set of sweet soda sounds and add them to your playlist
  • create new words or terms to replace stale old ones. For example: a politician is a = figmentaller, an epidemic is a = verbubonic tombola, an election is = pickalumny, winter is the = season of giftragical gloomagles (these are mine, create your own and the idea here is to focus on things that currently irritate or distress you)
  • Pick a random topic each day and write 200 hundred words about it. Hubspot have a random topic generator here: https://www.hubspot.com/blog-topic-generator I also like the random conversation starter here at capitalizemytitle.com: https://capitalizemytitle.com/random-topic-generator/ the general idea here is to write something that is normally “out of reach” of your mind

Tips to keep your passion for writing alive:

  • Practice makes passion stronger; if you don’t practice, your passion will disappear
  • Don’t feed your brain with fear and disappointment, set goals that are rational and sensible. Be nice (to yourself)
  • A challenge is all very well, but it won’t help if your passion is injured by an unrealistic self-imposed limit or unfair wordcount target
  • Reward yourself when deadlines are met. Reaching goals is satisfying and it’s part of the passion process. So, to make sure you’re full to the brim with energy, and ready to face the impossible again soon, give yourself a brief rest and reward yourself
  • Don’t imagine your goals must always be towering or staggering. Sometimes nice little goals that can be accomplished in a day or even a few hours can make a much bigger difference to your health and well-being than a passion that will take a lifetime to complete. Do you think Edmund Hillary just climbed Everest? Of course not, he did a lot of small hills. Do you think Haile Gebrselassie (Olympic long-distance runner) runs a marathon every day? Of course not, he merely jogs around his neighborhood. So keep your goals reasonable. And keep them fun.

    Keep the passion going!

    Neil Mach is the author of “So You Want to Write Fantasy?” out NOW on Amazon Kindle

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